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114th Medical Group Airmen Train at Tripler Medical Simulation Center

Senior Airmen Ashley Eickman, 114th Medical Group medic, inserts a chest tube on a practice dummy at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI.

Senior Airmen Ashley Eickman, 114th Medical Group medic, inserts a chest tube on a practice dummy at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI. The TMSC provides a place for nurses, medics, doctors, and other medical professionals a place to hone and improve their skills. (U.S. Air National Guard Photo by Staff Sgt. Duane Duimstra)

114th Medical Group Airmen work on a high-technology mannequin with simulated cardiac arrest at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI.

114th Medical Group Airmen work on a high-technology mannequin with simulated cardiac arrest at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI. The TMSC provides a place for nurses, medics, doctors, and other medical professionals a place to hone and improve their skills. (U.S. Air National Guard Photo by Staff Sgt. Duane Duimstra)

Honolulu, HI --

 

114th Medical Group Airmen took a break from the cold of South Dakota and utilized the Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, Jan. 12 to improve training. The TMSC center provides a place for nurses, medics, doctors, and other medical professionals to hone and improve their very specialized skills.


The TMSC supports nearly 4,000 staff members who are responsible for more than 260,000 beneficiaries throughout the Pacific.


“The TMSC is a good place for our medical personnel to build confidence in their skills for real world situations.” said Lt. Col. Doria Hirsch, 114th Medical Group clinical nurse, and acting commander for the group’s training deployment.


114th medics practiced basic medical procedures such as IVs, sutures, and proper intubation techniques.


By utilizing a high-technology mannequin, members simulated scenarios that may occur in an emergency room situation. The mannequin can simulate a pulse and other vital signs that mimic a human.  Members were able to use IVs and a defibrillator on it to practice lifesaving techniques vital to their mission.


Several scenarios were practiced with the mannequin ranging from a drug overdose to a patient going into cardiac arrest.


“The mannequin provides us with hands-on realistic situational training.” said Hirsch. 


Training on this deployment will help the unit to accomplish their mission of developing and maintaining highly trained and professional medical personnel capable of providing combat medical services.

 

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114th Medical Group Airmen Train at Tripler Medical Simulation Center

Senior Airmen Ashley Eickman, 114th Medical Group medic, inserts a chest tube on a practice dummy at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI.

Senior Airmen Ashley Eickman, 114th Medical Group medic, inserts a chest tube on a practice dummy at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI. The TMSC provides a place for nurses, medics, doctors, and other medical professionals a place to hone and improve their skills. (U.S. Air National Guard Photo by Staff Sgt. Duane Duimstra)

114th Medical Group Airmen work on a high-technology mannequin with simulated cardiac arrest at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI.

114th Medical Group Airmen work on a high-technology mannequin with simulated cardiac arrest at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI. The TMSC provides a place for nurses, medics, doctors, and other medical professionals a place to hone and improve their skills. (U.S. Air National Guard Photo by Staff Sgt. Duane Duimstra)

Honolulu, HI --

 

114th Medical Group Airmen took a break from the cold of South Dakota and utilized the Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, Jan. 12 to improve training. The TMSC center provides a place for nurses, medics, doctors, and other medical professionals to hone and improve their very specialized skills.


The TMSC supports nearly 4,000 staff members who are responsible for more than 260,000 beneficiaries throughout the Pacific.


“The TMSC is a good place for our medical personnel to build confidence in their skills for real world situations.” said Lt. Col. Doria Hirsch, 114th Medical Group clinical nurse, and acting commander for the group’s training deployment.


114th medics practiced basic medical procedures such as IVs, sutures, and proper intubation techniques.


By utilizing a high-technology mannequin, members simulated scenarios that may occur in an emergency room situation. The mannequin can simulate a pulse and other vital signs that mimic a human.  Members were able to use IVs and a defibrillator on it to practice lifesaving techniques vital to their mission.


Several scenarios were practiced with the mannequin ranging from a drug overdose to a patient going into cardiac arrest.


“The mannequin provides us with hands-on realistic situational training.” said Hirsch. 


Training on this deployment will help the unit to accomplish their mission of developing and maintaining highly trained and professional medical personnel capable of providing combat medical services.

 

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114th Medical Group Airmen Train at Tripler Medical Simulation Center

Senior Airmen Ashley Eickman, 114th Medical Group medic, inserts a chest tube on a practice dummy at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI.

Senior Airmen Ashley Eickman, 114th Medical Group medic, inserts a chest tube on a practice dummy at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI. The TMSC provides a place for nurses, medics, doctors, and other medical professionals a place to hone and improve their skills. (U.S. Air National Guard Photo by Staff Sgt. Duane Duimstra)

114th Medical Group Airmen work on a high-technology mannequin with simulated cardiac arrest at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI.

114th Medical Group Airmen work on a high-technology mannequin with simulated cardiac arrest at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI. The TMSC provides a place for nurses, medics, doctors, and other medical professionals a place to hone and improve their skills. (U.S. Air National Guard Photo by Staff Sgt. Duane Duimstra)

Honolulu, HI --

 

114th Medical Group Airmen took a break from the cold of South Dakota and utilized the Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, Jan. 12 to improve training. The TMSC center provides a place for nurses, medics, doctors, and other medical professionals to hone and improve their very specialized skills.


The TMSC supports nearly 4,000 staff members who are responsible for more than 260,000 beneficiaries throughout the Pacific.


“The TMSC is a good place for our medical personnel to build confidence in their skills for real world situations.” said Lt. Col. Doria Hirsch, 114th Medical Group clinical nurse, and acting commander for the group’s training deployment.


114th medics practiced basic medical procedures such as IVs, sutures, and proper intubation techniques.


By utilizing a high-technology mannequin, members simulated scenarios that may occur in an emergency room situation. The mannequin can simulate a pulse and other vital signs that mimic a human.  Members were able to use IVs and a defibrillator on it to practice lifesaving techniques vital to their mission.


Several scenarios were practiced with the mannequin ranging from a drug overdose to a patient going into cardiac arrest.


“The mannequin provides us with hands-on realistic situational training.” said Hirsch. 


Training on this deployment will help the unit to accomplish their mission of developing and maintaining highly trained and professional medical personnel capable of providing combat medical services.

 

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114th Medical Group Airmen Train at Tripler Medical Simulation Center

Senior Airmen Ashley Eickman, 114th Medical Group medic, inserts a chest tube on a practice dummy at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI.

Senior Airmen Ashley Eickman, 114th Medical Group medic, inserts a chest tube on a practice dummy at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI. The TMSC provides a place for nurses, medics, doctors, and other medical professionals a place to hone and improve their skills. (U.S. Air National Guard Photo by Staff Sgt. Duane Duimstra)

114th Medical Group Airmen work on a high-technology mannequin with simulated cardiac arrest at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI.

114th Medical Group Airmen work on a high-technology mannequin with simulated cardiac arrest at Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Jan. 12, 2018, Honolulu, HI. The TMSC provides a place for nurses, medics, doctors, and other medical professionals a place to hone and improve their skills. (U.S. Air National Guard Photo by Staff Sgt. Duane Duimstra)

Honolulu, HI --

 

114th Medical Group Airmen took a break from the cold of South Dakota and utilized the Tripler Medical Simulation Center, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, Jan. 12 to improve training. The TMSC center provides a place for nurses, medics, doctors, and other medical professionals to hone and improve their very specialized skills.


The TMSC supports nearly 4,000 staff members who are responsible for more than 260,000 beneficiaries throughout the Pacific.


“The TMSC is a good place for our medical personnel to build confidence in their skills for real world situations.” said Lt. Col. Doria Hirsch, 114th Medical Group clinical nurse, and acting commander for the group’s training deployment.


114th medics practiced basic medical procedures such as IVs, sutures, and proper intubation techniques.


By utilizing a high-technology mannequin, members simulated scenarios that may occur in an emergency room situation. The mannequin can simulate a pulse and other vital signs that mimic a human.  Members were able to use IVs and a defibrillator on it to practice lifesaving techniques vital to their mission.


Several scenarios were practiced with the mannequin ranging from a drug overdose to a patient going into cardiac arrest.


“The mannequin provides us with hands-on realistic situational training.” said Hirsch. 


Training on this deployment will help the unit to accomplish their mission of developing and maintaining highly trained and professional medical personnel capable of providing combat medical services.