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114th Medical Group Hone Skills on Advanced Mannequins

Tech. Sgt. Rachel Vanbeek, 114th Medical Group, aerospace medical technician, assigned tasks to her trauma team during a simulated medical emergency inside the Simulation in Motion South Dakota (SIMSD) vehicle at Joe Foss Field May 6, 2017.  SIMSD was on base to provide highly realistic simulations for the 114th Medical Group medics.  The SDNG will continue to maintain ready and reliable units, and have equipment and facilities, which support both federal and state missions.  (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Christopher Stewart/Released)

Tech. Sgt. Rachel Vanbeek, 114th Medical Group, aerospace medical technician, assigned tasks to her trauma team during a simulated medical emergency inside the Simulation in Motion South Dakota (SIMSD) vehicle at Joe Foss Field May 6, 2017. SIMSD was on base to provide highly realistic simulations for the 114th Medical Group medics. The SDNG will continue to maintain ready and reliable units, and have equipment and facilities, which support both federal and state missions. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Christopher Stewart/Released)

Simulation in Motion South Dakota (SIMSD) visited Joe Foss Field in order to provide realistic medical simulations to 114th Medical Group medics May 7, 2017.  The training was a refresher on trauma care for patients.  Never in the history of the National Guard have we been better trained, equipped or more heavily relied upon than we are today.  (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Christopher Stewart/Released)

Simulation in Motion South Dakota (SIMSD) visited Joe Foss Field in order to provide realistic medical simulations to 114th Medical Group medics May 7, 2017. The training was a refresher on trauma care for patients. Never in the history of the National Guard have we been better trained, equipped or more heavily relied upon than we are today. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Christopher Stewart/Released)

Branden Marienau, Simulation in Motion South Dakota (SIMSD) education coordinator, shared a few tips with a team of medics from the 114th Medical Group during a simulated medical emergency in the SIMSD Vehicle on Joe Foss Field May 6, 2017.  The Vehicle was visiting Jose Foss Field in order to provide realistic trauma emergency simulations to the medics from the 114th Medical Group.  (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Christopher Stewart/Released)

Branden Marienau, Simulation in Motion South Dakota (SIMSD) education coordinator, shared a few tips with a team of medics from the 114th Medical Group during a simulated medical emergency in the SIMSD Vehicle on Joe Foss Field May 6, 2017. The Vehicle was visiting Jose Foss Field in order to provide realistic trauma emergency simulations to the medics from the 114th Medical Group. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Christopher Stewart/Released)

Sioux Falls, S.D. (May 6, 2017) --

Medics with the 114th Medical Group had the unique opportunity to hone their skills on lifelike mannequins.  The lifelike mannequins and simulated trauma room were brought out to Joe Foss Field by Simulation in Motion South Dakota (SIMSD) truck from Avera Health.

“This is the most lifelike scenarios we can have,” said Tech. Sgt. Rachel Vanbeek, 114th Medical Group aerospace medical technician.  “The mannequins will actually give you vital signs, they will respond to you, and do things that a normal patient will do.”

The realism of the simulation provides medics from the 114th an opportunity to practice scenarios they may rarely see.  The mannequins have the ability to display a large range of vitals and symptoms including heart and lung sounds, pulse at all pulse points, sweating bleeding and bowl sounds.  The operators can speak and grown through speakers built into the Mannequins head in reaction to the trauma team.  The simulation includes a full array of medicines and IVs that can be administered to the mannequins, which will then respond with improving or deteriorating vital signs. 

“We can simulate and discuss a patient from a variety of unique circumstances, which is a great refresher,” said Branden Marienau, simulation education coordinator for SIMSD. “We can talk about the latest trends and medical advances.”

The back half of the SIMSD truck can also simulate the back of an ambulance.  Both spaces are controlled by a high-tech control system in the center of the truck where personnel control the vitals and responses of the simulated patients on a sophisticated computer program.

 “The team that runs the simulation and training session consists of an individual with paramedic experience as well as a registered nurse with emergency and trauma experience,” said Marienau. “We go over different types of procedures and techniques that we find are useful and work well.”

This training directly supports the 114th Medical Group mission to develop and maintain highly trained, professional, medical personnel capable of providing combat medical services.

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